Elephantiasis linked to volcanic soils found in Uganda

By Esther Nakkazi [KAMPALA] A surge in elephantiasis in Uganda is being linked to people walking barefoot on volcanic soils which contain tiny, sharp mineral crystals that penetrated the feet, a study says. Elephantiasis is a neglected tropical disease (NTD) caused mainly by parasitic thread-like worm called Wuchereria bancrofti, resulting in painful swelling of arms …

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Medicinal plants can play a key role in treating malaria

Jeremiah Waweru Gathirwa, Kenya Medical Research Institute and Ruth Monyenye Nyang’acha, Kenya Medical Research Institute It will take effective prevention, accurate and timely diagnosis and treatment to successfully eliminate malaria. But none of this will help if the causative agents become resistant to the drugs used for treatment. The Conversation Africa’s Health and Medicine Editor …

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NCDs are 23 per cent of Africa’s disease burden

By Sam Otieno [NAIROBI] Stem cell science — study of cells that have the capacity to develop into other cells types — could solve Africa’s noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) burden, says a report. A workshop report, published by African Academy of Sciences and the Stellenbosch Institute for Advanced Study in February, states that investing time and …

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African people live longer but lifestyle diseases on rise

Charles Wiysonge, Stellenbosch University Malaria, HIV, pneumonia, and diarrhoea are the leading killers on the African continent, according to a recently released study looking at the burden of diseases across the world. In 1980 the list looked different. Then the leading killer diseases were also diarrhoea, pneumonia and malaria, but tuberculosis and measles were up …

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Ebola virus found in survivors’ semen, 9 months later

By Pauline Okoth Preliminary results of a study in Sierra Leone documenting Ebola virus persistence in body fluids have confirmed the presence of the virus in survivors’ semen up to nine months after the onset of infection. The WHO declared Sierra Leone free of Ebola virus transmission in the human population last month (7 November), …

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