Many East African kids attend school – but not enough are actually learning

Sam Jones, University of Copenhagen Much has been written about the failings of primary education systems in East Africa. Teachers are often lambasted for being absent from school, for being poorly motivated, and even for lacking basic knowledge about the subjects they teach. It’s not all bad: genuine successes have been registered in improving enrolment …

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Free university education is not the route to social justice

George Hull, University of Cape Town “Free education in our lifetime” is the campaign slogan many students have adopted in the recent protests across South Africa against university fee increases. The country’s higher education minister is among those who have replied that, although free education for all university students would be the ideal, it is …

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What young Africans want from business education programmes

Walter Baets, University of Cape Town If you ask people what they consider the world’s most prestigious business degree, most are likely to answer, “An MBA.” Indeed, the Master of Business Administration remains a hugely popular business degree and still impresses many employers. Germany, the Netherlands, Poland and Denmark are among 29 countries where interest …

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Mentoring the next generation of scientists in Africa

Sibusiso Moyo, Durban University of Technology Mentoring the next generation of scientists in Africa should start from primary school, continue at university and extend into the workplace. We must encourage the majority of female African students to choose a career in science so that they contribute to the economic and social development of the continent. …

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Moving beyond the educational blame game in South Africa

Alan Cliff, University of Cape Town Most of the young people who matriculate in South Africa and qualify on paper to apply to study further simply aren’t ready for the rigours of a university education. This isn’t a sweeping generalisation: it’s proved by data collected over five years as part of the country’s National Benchmark …

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