S&T could raise Africa’s agricultural productivity

By Paul Boateng For Africa to achieve increased agricultural productivity, there is a need to invest in S&T, writes Paul Boateng. On my way straight from Kenya’s Jomo Kenyatta International Airport in Nairobi to a meeting and stuck in one of the city’s endless car jams, my taxi driver began a conversation about the lack …

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Universities need to work with tech companies

Martin Hall, University of Cape Town The world of higher and professional education is changing rapidly. Digitally-enabled learning, in all its forms, is here to stay. Over the last five years, massive open online courses (MOOCs) have enabled universities to share their expertise with millions across the world. This shows how rapidly developing digital technologies …

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Low-cost tech needed to beat malaria in Africa

By Sam Otieno [NAIROBI] Investing in low-cost technological innovations and tools could reduce malaria burden in Africa, say experts. Speaking at a workshop on closing gaps to protect people from deadly forms of malaria held in Kenya this month (21 April) — barely a week before World Malaria Day (25 April), the experts emphasised that …

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Online tool aids resilience to climate change impacts

By Sam Otieno [NAIROBI] An online tool that aids analyses and use of climate data to boost resilience to climate impacts has been launched in Kenya. The tool was launched during the Enhancing National Climate Services workshop organised last month (16 March) by Kenya Meteorological Department (KMD) in collaboration with US-based International Research Institute for …

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Kenya: will technology deliver a free and fair election?

John Walubengo, Multimedia University of Kenya Elections present a milestone beyond which countries either strengthen their democratic credentials or become failed states. Often states fail when there are either perceived or blatant election malpractices. This in turn can lead to prolonged civil unrest. Numerous cases exist across the continent. But I will use the Kenyan …

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