Rape in South Africa: why the system is failing women

Dee Smythe, University of Cape Town About 150 women report being raped to the police in South Africa daily. Fewer than 30 of the cases will be prosecuted, and no more than 10 will result in a conviction. This translates into an overall conviction rate of 4% – 8% of reported cases. In this edited …

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Why it might take more than the buzz of bees to ward off elephants

Mduduzi Ndlovu, University of the Witwatersrand Elephant populations in southern Africa’s national parks have increased dramatically in recent years. As a result of their booming numbers, vast dietary requirements and expansive ranges, elephants sometimes roam outside the borders of protected areas in search of food. Farmers in communities surrounding national parks rely heavily on subsistence …

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Africa News Headlines for 7 February 2016

A selection of headlines covering news from Sub-Saharan Africa over the past 24 hours. An African female soccer legend is helping to coach Afghan migrant boys in Sweden Source: Southern Times Kenya: Scientists say Zika Virus Unlikely to Spread in East Africa Source: Geeska Afrika African leaders advocate locally developed Zika, Lassa virus vaccines Source: …

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Why art and culture contribute more to an economy than growth and jobs

Jen Snowball, Rhodes University There is growing international interest in the potential of the cultural and creative industries to drive sustainable development and create inclusive job opportunities. An indication of this is a recent set of UNESCO guidelines on how to measure and compile statistics about the economic contribution of the cultural industries. But should …

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Why South Africa’s plans to militarise humanitarian work are misguided

Savo Heleta, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University The South African Defence Review, the country’s new defence policy, was approved in March 2014. It guides policy-making for the next two to three decades. The promotion of stability and peace in Africa is a priority for South Africa. The Defence Review says it will contribute to the prevention …

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