Why African fans love European football – a Senegalese perspective

Mark Hann, University of Amsterdam Casillas throws the ball to Thuram, standing on the edge of his penalty area. The big defender passes to Zidane, who turns and dribbles past two opponents before playing a precise through-ball for Iniesta, who lays it on for Alves on the right wing. Alves curls in an accurate cross, …

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Sport for peace and development: Zambia shows how

Iain Lindsey, Durham University; Davies Banda, University of Edinburgh; Ruth Jeanes, Monash University, and Tess Kay, Brunel University London Sport has the potential to change lives. High profile examples of individual sportsmen and women often receive significant publicity, like the ten refugee athletes who competed at the Rio Olympics in 2016, or the charitable work …

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South Africa should do more to promote women in sport

Michelle Sikes, Stellenbosch University and Nana Adom – Aboagye, University of Johannesburg South Africa fancies itself to be passionate about sports and over the past two decades has launched a series of initiatives to promote women’s participation. But it doesn’t have a great deal to show for it. Women still remain underrepresented in all sports …

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Banning Kenya from Rio presents an Olympian dilemma

Paul Dimeo, University of Stirling The World Anti-Doping Agency, the International Olympic Committee and the International Association of Athletics Federations are facing a real dilemma. Having pushed Kenya towards improving its anti-doping environment, the question remains whether to follow through and deliver the ultimate sanction – disqualification from the 2016 Rio Olympic Games. Such a …

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More sex during South Africa’s World Cup meant more boys nine months on

Gwinyai Masukume, University of the Witwatersrand and Victor Grech, University of Malta Nine months after South Africa hosted the 2010 football World Cup a disproportionately higher number of male babies were born compared with the previous eight years. There are two reasons for this: people were having more sex and they were happy. In our …

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