Big game: banning trophy hunting could do more harm than good

Corey Bradshaw and Enrico Di Minin, University of Helsinki Furious debate around the role of trophy hunting in conservation raged in 2015, after the killing of Cecil the lion in Zimbabwe, and a critically endangered black rhino in Namibia. Together, these two incidents triggered vocal appeals to ban trophy hunting throughout Africa. While to most …

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Smaller African cities need sustainable energy intervention

Louise Tait, University of Cape Town Africa is experiencing a massive flow of people into urban areas. This is happening in major urban centres such as Lagos, Accra and Dar es Salaam as well as in smaller and secondary cities. The pace at which this urban growth is happening inevitably puts strain on city authorities. …

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Why a ban on hunting in Botswana isn’t the answer to challenges facing the country

Melville Saayman, North-West University When Botswana’s government announced a ban on hunting about two years ago, the news was welcomed by anti-hunting organisations. But communities, hunting operators and game farmers were not happy at all. Hunting, and especially trophy hunting, generates millions – particularly in rural areas where there are high levels of unemployment and …

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The shaming of Walter Palmer for killing Cecil the Lion

Jennifer Jacquet, New York University US trophy hunter Walter Palmer must be the world’s most hated dentist. News that Palmer had killed Cecil, a handsome and well-known lion in Zimbabwe, sparked outrage both online and off. Palmer quickly became the latest case study in 21st-century shaming, where opprobrium can be expressed in limitless quantities and …

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Cecil the lion was a victim of deep-rooted and persistent arrogance towards wildlife

Eric Jensen, University of Warwick The killing of Cecil the lion in Zimbabwe has brought fresh attention to an entrenched, ongoing crisis in wildlife conservation. As unsustainable global consumption and population growth continue to roll back the space for wild animals around the world, many species are on the edge of extinction. This crisis has …

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