Ebola over, but WHO failure pinned on politicians

By Tania Rabesandratana Just as the World Health Organization (WHO) celebrates the end of the Ebola epidemic in West Africa, an academic paper says governments “bear the bulk of responsibility” for the UN body’s failures during the 2014 Ebola outbreak. Yesterday (14 January), the WHO declared the end of the most recent outbreak in Liberia. …

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Cancer and meat – too much hype?

Nicolette Hall, University of Pretoria and Hester Carina Schönfeldt, University of Pretoria The World Health Organisation’s report warning of the link between processed meat and an increased cancer risk has taken the globe by storm and resulted in a flurry of overwhelmingly negative publicity around meat and meat products. According to the International Agency for …

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Mosquito-hunting spiders could help fight deadly malaria

By Sarah Ooko [NAIROBI] Mosquito-eating spiders from East Africa and Malaysia could become a new weapon in fighting malaria, researchers have said. A species of spiders found only around Lake Victoria in East Africa, called Evarcha culicivora, is adapted to hunt female Anopheles mosquitoes that transmit malaria parasites. “This is unique. There’s no other animal …

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New media could topple ‘helicopter journalism’ in Africa

By Lou Del Bello [Republished under a Creative Commons license from SciDev.Net.] When first I heard the term “helicopter journalism” I thought it referred to the trend of reporting using drones. Actually it refers to a completely different practice, albeit one that shares some characteristics of drone footage. Aerial filming creates striking yet accessible images …

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Six lessons from the initial failed international response to Ebola

By Catherine Gegout, University of Nottingham [Republished under a Creative Commons license from The Conversation.] The Ebola virus has killed more than 9,000 people – about 2,000 in Guinea, 3,000 in Sierra Leone and 4,000 in Liberia. The outbreak started in Guinea in December 2013, but the Ebola crisis really started in April 2014 when …

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