Can a Free-Market Solution Solve Malawi’s Poverty Crisis?

by Ibrahim B. Anoba The International Labour Organization (ILO) recently reported that over 12 million Malawians could become poor by 2030 if poverty reduction rates remain the same. This is despite Malawi’s slight improvement in GDP per capita since 2004, and the implementation of numerous measures to counter poverty, including increased government spendings on infrastructure …

Continue reading ‘Can a Free-Market Solution Solve Malawi’s Poverty Crisis?’ »

Crossing the Congo Is a Journey Across Hell on Earth

by John Tamny “Our hearts just broke – they just wanted to get out of their lives,” but “we had to drive off with Charlie and me hanging off the car literally beating the guys away.” Those are the words of Mike Martin about midway through Crossing the Congo: Over Land and Water in a …

Continue reading ‘Crossing the Congo Is a Journey Across Hell on Earth’ »

African Cities — Built for Wealth Consumption Not Creation

by Daniel Knowles A few days before Christmas, I had the most tense journey to an airport of my life. I was in Kinshasa, the capital of the Democratic Republic of Congo, where I had been reporting on the end of President Joseph Kabila’s term (he had refused to step down, despite being constitutionally limited to …

Continue reading ‘African Cities — Built for Wealth Consumption Not Creation’ »

South Africa’s national minimum wage could hurt small firms, rural workers

Dieter von Fintel, Stellenbosch University and Marlies Piek, Stellenbosch University South Africa will formally adopt a national minimum wage of US$1.5 (ZAR20.00) per hour on Workers’ Day next year. There are questions as to whether this is enough to be termed a victory for the country’s working poor? If historical trends continue, our research shows …

Continue reading ‘South Africa’s national minimum wage could hurt small firms, rural workers’ »

How Africa Got Left Behind

by Marian L. Tupy Robert Colvile’s excellent article on Prince Charles’s misunderstanding of the causes of African poverty provides a good opportunity to take a closer look at Africa’s economic history. African poverty was not caused by colonialism, capitalism or free trade. As I have noted before, many of Europe’s former dependencies became rich precisely because …

Continue reading ‘How Africa Got Left Behind’ »