Africa Analysis: What a new alliance needs to succeed

By Linda Nordling Inspiration comes in many forms. To Berhanu Abegaz, executive director of the African Academy of Sciences (AAS), it comes as a bone ten centimetres in length with tiny notches carved into its sides. The Ishango bone was found in 1960 in Central Africa by a Belgian explorer, and is on display today …

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Urbanisation reducing Ghanaian smallholders’ lands

By Samuel Hinneh [ACCRA] Fertile farmlands are rapidly declining in Ghana due to pressure from population growth and urbanisation, threatening rural livelihoods and food security, according to a new report. The report says Ghana’s urban areas are expanding at a rate of 3.5 per cent annually as a result of a rising population. The report …

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Initiatives launched to drive R&D in Africa

By Dann Okoth, Sam Otieno [NAIROBI A new scientific alliance and two other initiatives to provide long-term opportunities for developing research leadership and innovation to help tackle Africa’s development challenges have been launched. The Alliance for Accelerating Excellence in Science in Africa (AESA), unveiled in Kenya last week (10 September), will enable researchers and technology …

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What young Africans want from business education programmes

Walter Baets, University of Cape Town If you ask people what they consider the world’s most prestigious business degree, most are likely to answer, “An MBA.” Indeed, the Master of Business Administration remains a hugely popular business degree and still impresses many employers. Germany, the Netherlands, Poland and Denmark are among 29 countries where interest …

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Mugabe takes the cake when it comes to gaffes – but he’s not alone

Pieter Nagel, University of Limpopo Whose line is it anyway? I remember coming back to South Africa from my first overseas trip to Europe in 1999. We were beginning our second semester of teaching in English Studies at the university at the time and I was scheduled to teach a few lectures on a Shakespearean …

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