Africa Is Getting Richer, Thanks to Capitalism

Marian L. Tupy Sub-Saharan Africa consists of 46 countries and covers an area of 9.4 million square miles. One out of seven people on earth live in Africa, and the continent’s share of the world’s population is bound to increase because Africa’s fertility rate remains higher than elsewhere. Nigeria will be bigger than the United …

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Ranking African universities: hypocrisy, impunity and complicity

Damtew Teferra, University of KwaZulu-Natal Nearly ten years ago I confronted an expert about what she claimed was an “African phenomenon” in higher education. She was reluctant to provide me with the raw data upon which this “phenomenon” was premised, so I vigorously contested her claim. Later I managed to access that data through a …

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New initiative to give Africa cheap electricity

By Baraka Rateng’ [NAIROBI] A new initiative, Scaling Off-Grid Energy: A Grand Challenge for Development, will invest US$36 million to empower entrepreneurs and investors to connect 20 million households in Sub-Saharan Africa with off-grid energy by 2030. The initiative was announced at the US Global Entrepreneurship Summit last month (23 June) by USAID administrator Gayle …

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Khat: its changing politics in Kenya & Somalia after UK ban

Neil Carrier, University of Oxford In 2014 the UK banned khat, the stimulant stems and leaves of the tree Catha edulis. In Kenya it is more commonly known as miraa or veve. This move brought to an end the weekly importation into London’s Heathrow of about 56 tonnes of the commodity. Most had been grown …

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Are fees the best way forward Nigeria’s universities?

By Jon Spaull     The University of Ibadan in Nigeria is “emblematic of the crisis of the Nigerian state”, argues the institution’s vice-chancellor, Abel Idowu Olayinka, in this video interview. The University of Ibadan opened in 1948 as a small African outpost of London University, with just 104 students. Over the past 70 years, …

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