Social media and fake news batter Kenya’s traditional media

George Ogola, University of Central Lancashire The recent Kenyan elections firmly demonstrated the incursion and perhaps even gradual institutionalisation of fake news as an actor in modern politics, particularly during elections. Although the term fake news is now so liberally used to the extent it eludes precise definition, many agree it’s the deliberate dissemination of …

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Conflicting laws keep Nigeria’s electricity supply unreliable

Yemi Oke, University of Lagos Nigeria’s energy sector is regulated centrally by the Nigerian Electricity Regulatory Commission. This has created the conditions for corruption to thrive. The result is that the supply of electricity is unstable and cannot support economic development. Decentralised regulation is the solution, but has been prevented by conflicting laws. Supplying electricity …

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Researchers model ways to control maize lethal necrosis

By Eldon Opiyo [NAIROBI] Researchers have used mathematical modelling to develop techniques to combat two co-infecting viruses causing maize lethal necrosis (MLN) in Kenya. According to researchers who conducted the new study, because maize is a staple crop in Sub-Saharan Africa, the spread of MLN is threatening food security in the region. Nik Cunniffe, a …

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Warhol in Africa: contradictions, complications and conflicts

Stacey Vorster, University of the Witwatersrand On the evening of 26 July, over 5,000 people streamed into Wits Art Museum in Johannesburg to attend the opening of its latest exhibition, Warhol Unscreened: Artworks from the Bank of America Merrill Lynch Collection. Andy Warhol, an American artist known for his images of pop culture, celebrities and …

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More Patronizing European Advice Won’t Make Africa Rich

by Stacy Ndlovu Last month, during a press conference at the G20 summit in Hamburg, Germany, a journalist from the Ivory Coast asked French President Emmanuel Macron why there was no Marshall Plan for Africa. His response, which included a claim that Africa’s problems were, at least in part, “civilisational” triggered a predictable social media …

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