Ghana’s jury system needs urgent reform

Julia Selman Ayetey, University of Cape Coast In 1872 Mark Twain wrote that juries were “the most ingenious and infallible agency for defeating justice that human wisdom could contrive”. More than 140 years later his statement unfortunately holds true for Ghana. Ghana is one of only a handful of African countries that still use juries. …

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Trial in Senegal of former Chadian president is a victory for civil society

Marie Gibert, Birkbeck, University of London Hopes have been raised that the victims of atrocities perpetrated more than 25 years ago by the regime of Hissène Habré, Chad’s former president, may at last find justice. The former dictator is on trial before Senegal’s Extraordinary African Chambers for crimes including the politically motivated murders of at …

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Al-Bashir: South Africa’s moment of glory and shame

David E Kiwuwa, Princeton University Sudan President Omar al-Bashir’s decision to leave South Africa speedily to avoid arrest on an International Criminal Court (ICC) indictment while attending the 25th African Union summit was a dramatic diplomatic development. The warrant, issued in March 2009, was for various crimes against humanity including pillage, murder, extermination, torture, and …

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Prime Evil: why South Africa has released Eugene De Kock

By Paul Jackson, University of Birmingham [Republished with a Creative Commons license from The Conversation.] The release of Eugene de Kock, former commander of the notorious Vlakplaas counterinsurgency unit responsible for numerous clandestine assassinations in apartheid South Africa, raises a number of critical issues with respect to justice in societies in transition. De Kock was …

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