Sport for peace and development: Zambia shows how

Iain Lindsey, Durham University; Davies Banda, University of Edinburgh; Ruth Jeanes, Monash University, and Tess Kay, Brunel University London Sport has the potential to change lives. High profile examples of individual sportsmen and women often receive significant publicity, like the ten refugee athletes who competed at the Rio Olympics in 2016, or the charitable work …

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South Sudan crisis is complex, but there’s an exit from fragility

Sarah Logan, International Growth Centre and Peter Biar Ajak, International Growth Centre South Sudan has faced significant challenges since civil war broke out in December 2013. The violence was triggered by disagreements between President Salva Kiir and former Vice President Riek Machar. Since then conflict has become widespread and has flared in previously peaceful regions. …

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Technology for peace: Facts and figures

By Giorgia Scaturro Giorgia Scaturro examines how phones, drones, satellites and computer games help spot and prevent conflict. Technology has shaped modern warfare for decades. But it can be used to counteract conflicts as much as to ignite them. And this is reflected in recent trends in conflict and peace. According to the Global peace …

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Can tech tip the balance towards peace?

By Anita Makri Programmes to counter conflict are enlisting digital tools. There are successes, and questions over lasting impact. It’s hard to escape a sense that the world is becoming a less peaceful place. Headlines are dominated by news of protracted warfare across the Middle East and North Africa, high-profile acts of terrorism and the …

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How to rebuild higher education in countries torn apart by war

Savo Heleta, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University Universities are almost always among the casualties when a country goes to war. Ultimately, they become hotbeds of repression. As conflict deepens, academic freedom is threatened or curtailed. Teachers, researchers and students flee, prompting a brain drain their countries can ill afford. Buildings are bombed. Sometimes entire campuses are …

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