John J. Sullivan: Remarks on Human Rights and Religious Freedom in Sudan

The U.S. Deputy Secretary of State, John J. Sullivan, made these remarks on human rights and religious liberty in Khartoum on November 17, 2017. Asalaam Alaikam. I am honored to join all of you here today. I would like to first thank the leaders of the Al-Neelain Mosque for hosting us today and for their gracious …

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Stability in the DRC: beyond political agreements

Yvan Yenda Ilunga, Rutgers University Once again, the cycle of instability and political uncertainty has the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) on high alert and agreements between prominent political actors have done little to stem the tide of violence. The situation has become so dire that Congolese nationals at home and abroad have raised concerns …

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When Women Are Free, Economies Thrive

by Chelsea Follett A bizarre column in Australia’s Daily Telegraph last month argued that it should be illegal to be a stay-at-home mom. The piece was met with ridicule, and rightly so. Women should be free to make their own choices about family and career. Fortunately, no country actually bans a woman’s choice to be a …

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How do human rights fare in South Africa after two decades?

Chris Jones, Stellenbosch University Every year South Africans celebrate Human Rights Day on March 21 to commemorate the 1960 Sharpeville massacre when police opened fire on a crowd killing 69 unarmed people. They were protesting against the humiliating pass laws that controlled the movement of black people. Besides a reminder of a dark period in …

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Exiting the ICC: South Africa betrays world, its own history

Henning Melber, University of Pretoria Once upon a time there was a country the majority of whose people were oppressed and systematically discriminated against by a minority regime. The violation of human rights was a structural feature of its system, euphemistically called “separate development”. The execution of power claimed to be based on the rule …

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