How Zimbabwe’s badly implemented land reform affects wildlife

Sam Williams, Durham University Large carnivores are in decline all over the world. Threats like persecution and loss of both prey and habitat are key contributors. The planet’s top biodiversity hotspots have already lost around 90% of their primary (undisturbed) vegetation, driven by factors like growth of infrastructure, agriculture and the removal of natural resources. …

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Fight against poaching must empower communities

Annette Hübschle, University of Cape Town Wildlife crimes – like rhino poaching, overfishing or the harvesting of cycads – were once considered a “green” matter. But this has changed. Such crimes have moved higher up on global security and policy agendas. This is partly linked to concerns about the extinction of species and the demise …

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How Nigeria is wasting its rich water resources

Nelson Odume, Rhodes University and Andrew Slaughter, Rhodes University Nigeria is so rich in water resources that many of its 36 states are named after rivers. In addition to surface water found in nearly every part of the country, there’s also plenty stored in the ground. The country has 215 cubic kilometres a year of …

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Sierra Leone mudslide was a preventable man-made tragedy

Joseph Macarthy, Njala University Sierra Leone is still reeling from the effects of a mudslide that killed nearly 1 000 people, left hundreds missing and rendered thousands homeless. After about five hours of heavy rainfall, the mudslide came down Mount Sugar-Loaf and almost wiped out Mortome. This is a relatively new settlement which emerged as …

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Lake Tanganyika’s fate lies in the balance

Andrew Cohen, University of Arizona Standing on the steep rocky shores of Lake Tanganyika at sunset, looking out at fishermen heading out for their nightly lamp-boat fishing trips, it’s easy to imagine this immense 32,900km2 body of water as serene and unchanging. Located in the western branch of the great African Rift Valley it’s divided …

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