Kenya’s early learning centers may do more harm than good

John Teria Ng’asike, Mount Kenya University Like the rest of the developing world, more and more women in Kenya are joining the formal workforce. As a result there’s been a growing need for centres that can care for young children. This has seen early childhood development and education centres in Kenya mushroom, spurred by a …

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Tanzania can’t stop child labour without fixing its school system

Simon Ngalomba, University of Dar es Salaam Children are particularly vulnerable to being forced into labour, trafficked from rural areas to cities and then trafficked again within cities. They can’t communicate assertively and are physically powerless next to most adults. In Tanzania, just more than a quarter of children aged between five and 14 – …

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Schooling can save African girls from becoming child brides

Michael Addaney, University of Energy and Natural Resources Millions of African girls are becoming wives every year. In Niger, about 75% of girls will become child brides before they turn 18. In Chad and the Central African Republic the figure is 68%. Some countries, like Ethiopia, are recording some important victories in the fight to …

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What final exam results reveal about South Africa’s school system

Natasha Joseph, The Conversation South Africa’s Basic Education Minister Angie Motshekga announced on January 5 that 70.7% of the country’s matrics – learners who wrote their final Grade 12 exams in 2015 – passed. Some can now apply for hotly contested university places; others will choose vocational training, take a gap year or try to …

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Many East African kids attend school – but not enough are actually learning

Sam Jones, University of Copenhagen Much has been written about the failings of primary education systems in East Africa. Teachers are often lambasted for being absent from school, for being poorly motivated, and even for lacking basic knowledge about the subjects they teach. It’s not all bad: genuine successes have been registered in improving enrolment …

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