Project using R&D is changing wheat farming in Africa

By Verenardo Meeme Wheat farmers in 12 African Countries – Benin Republic, Cote d’Ivoire, the Democratic Republic of Congo, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Ghana, Kenya, Lesotho, Madagascar, Mali, Mauritania, Niger, Nigeria, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Sudan, Tanzania, Uganda, Zambia and Zimbabwe – are benefiting from a project aimed at increasing production and reducing demand gap of the crop’s …

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Ancient DNA changes what we know about elephants’ evolution

Julien Benoit, University of the Witwatersrand For a long time, zoologists assumed that there were only two species of elephant: one Asian and one African. Then genetic analyses suggested that the African Elephant could be divided into two distinct species, the African Forest and African Savannah elephants. Now a new elephant has been added to …

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Journal dedicated to African research launched

By Gilbert Nakweya [KIGALI, RWANDA] A new peer reviewed, open access inter- and multidisciplinary scientific journal to showcase African research known as Scientific African has been launched. The journal launched at the Next Einstein Forum (NEF) in Rwanda this week (26-28 March) aims to offer African researchers and scientists the opportunity to publish and showcase …

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An appreciation of South Africa’s jazz stalwart Jonas Gwangwa

Gwen Ansell, University of Pretoria Music galore marked the passing early in 2018 of two South African titans of culture, Poet Laureate Keorapetse Kgositsile and trumpeter Hugh Masekela. Notable at their memorial events were powerfully moving tributes by two veterans still living: Caiphus Semenya and Jonas Gwangwa. They have shared stages and the perils of …

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Why Botswana Is Better Off Than Zimbabwe

By Daniel J. Mitchell What’s the best argument against statism? As a libertarian, my answer is that freedom is preferable to coercion. Freedom also ranks higher than prosperity. For instance, the government might be able to boost economic output by requiring people to work seven days a week, but such a policy would be odious and …

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